Tag Archives: exhibition

Claremont Museum of Art to Host Studio Tour on June 9

(May 16, 2012) – Many well known and esteemed artists will once again open their studios to the public for a day-long celebration of the creativity that continues to thrive in Claremont. The Claremont Museum of Art is sponsoring this biennial event on Saturday, June 9, 2012.

Studios will be open for viewing and mingling with the artists from 11:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m., with check-in at Memorial Park starting at 10:30 a.m. All artists will have objects d’art for sale and there will be an Opportunity Drawing and book sale. A one-of-kind “Artists’ Party” will follow from 5:00 p.m.-8:00 p.m. at Garner House.

The mission of the Claremont Museum of Art is to support art appreciation, arts education, and the
preservation of its collection held in public trust. We welcome the opportunity to invite the public to
meet the artists that contribute so much to the depth and richness of our community’s culture. We also thank the participating artists who are supporting this fundraising effort which allows our programming to continue.

This event only occurs every two years, so don’t miss out! A color map will be provided at check-in.

Cost for the tour and party is $35 per person or $25 for museum members. To reserve your ticket,
mail a check to Claremont Museum of Art, P.O. Box 1136, Claremont, CA 91711 or email info@claremontmuseum.org. For more information, see our website at www.claremontmuseum.org .

Check-in 10:30 a.m. Memorial Park, 840 N. Indian Hill Blvd., Claremont

Preview exhibition in the Claremont Heritage Ginger Elliott Exhibition Center

Follow the map to visit 20 Claremont area studios from 11am-4:00 p.m.

Artist’s Party, 5-8:00 p.m. at Garner House is included with your ticket

Win artwork in the Opportunity Drawing or shop for art books. Cost is $35 per person or $25 for museum members.

Reserve your ticket today! Mail a check to Claremont Museum of Art, P.O. Box 1136, Claremont, CA 91711 or email info@claremontmuseum.org.

Participating artists include Barnardo, Barbara Beretich, Steve Comba, Hollis Cooper, Keith Crockett, Jeff Faust, Gary Geraths, Crispin Gonzalez, Rebecca Hamm, Steven Hampton, Linda Hauser, Joyce Hesslegrave, Mike Hill, Carolyn Lee Howard, James Johnson, Nancy Macko, Tim Maxwell, John and Karen Neiuber, Osvaldo Orellana, Elizabeth Preston, Luis Ramirez, Anne Seltzer, Karen Sullivan, Norma Tanega, Briana Thomas, Chris Toovey, Peggy Trindle, Georgette Unis and Ahlene Welsh.

CLAREMONT MODERN: The Artists of the GI Bill

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February 17-26, 2012

In 2010, inspired by the Getty Foundation’s Pacific Standard Time celebration, Claremont Heritage and the Claremont Museum of Art formed a partnership to produce CLAREMONT MODERN, a series of four exhibitions in the Claremont Heritage Ginger Elliott Exhibition Space.

The third in our series, CLAREMONT MODERN: The Artists of the GI Bill examined the impact of the GI Bill on the Claremont art community.

As soldiers returned from WWII, the opportunity to study art was made possible by funding from the GI Bill. Some came to the Pomona College Art Department and stayed on. Millard Sheets developed the Graduate School Masters of Fine Art program in 1943-44 and admitted many talented GIs to study with art professors on the Scripps campus. These young men were older, more experienced with a focus and determination to pursue careers in art. The vision of Millard Sheets combined with the enthusiast energy of these GIs transformed Claremont into a vibrant art center at mid-century.

The Exhibition CLAREMONT MODERN: The Artists of the GI Bill focused on a pivotal point in the history of the Claremont art community from 1945-1960. It featured Claremont area artists who served in WWII, returned to study art with funding from the GI Bill and pursued a lifetime career in the arts.

It included works by Karl Benjamin, Paul Darrow, Rupert Deese, Carl Hertel, James Hueter, Anthony Ivins, Roger Kuntz, Doug McClellan, Harrison McIntosh, David Scott, Paul Soldner, John Svenson and Melvin Wood. The Exhibition was displayed for eight days in the Claremont Heritage Ginger Elliott Exhibition Space located in Memorial Park behind the Garner House.

CLAREMONT MODERN: The Fiesta Artists of Padua Hills, 1953-1959

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Harrison McIntosh

(November 20, 2011) –  One of a series of exhibitions produced by the Claremont Museum of Art and Claremont Heritage, Claremont Modern: The Fiesta Artists of Padua Hills 1953-1959 celebrates the artists and craftsmen of Claremont’s first art festival with historical material and work by thirty-five artists.

  • Saturdays and Sundays noon-5pm through December 18
  • Ginger Elliot Exhibition Center, 840 N. Indian Hill Boulevard, Claremont
  • The exhibition is free and open to the public

Inspired by Getty’s Pacific Standard Time celebration, Claremont Modern is a series of exhibitions that focus on the artistic vibrancy of Claremont at mid-century. Many of the artists who studied and lived here in the 1950-60s produced outstanding work that impacted the Modernism movement.

padua-watercolor with catFirst held in 1953, the Padua Hills Art Fiesta was organized by local artists to bring art into the community. The studio art movement that flourished here in the 1950s centered on the use of natural materials and traditional sensibilities – watercolor, pottery, woodworking, sculpture in stone, bronze and ceramic, mosaic, textiles as well as painting. Visitors came from miles around to meet the artists and watch “art in action” at the popular festival.

The exhibition will feature work by many of Claremont’s well-known artists: Karl Benjamin, Paul Darrow, Betty Davenport Ford, James Hueter,padua-sculpture Doug McClellan, Harrison McIntosh, James Strombotne, John Svenson and Jack Zajac. The exhibition includes a series of recent photographic portraits of these Fiesta artists by Sioux Bally-Maloof. Other 1950s artists are represented such as Paul Coates, Rupert Deese, Phil and Betty Dike, Diane Divelbess, Carl & Sue Hertel, Roger Kuntz, Sam Maloof, Walter Mix, Hildred Reents, Millard Sheets, Albert and Marion Stewart, Sylvia Pauloo-Taylor, Ed Traynor, Melvin Wood, Robert E. Wood and Milford Zornes.

The exhibition is accompanied by a booklet funded by the Claremont Community Foundation and available for $5.

The Padua Hills Art Fiesta Returns after 52 Years

Fiesta Artists, 1950s

Fiesta Artists, 1950s

(October 22, 2011) – Last held in 1959, the Padua Hills Art Fiesta will again fill the grounds of the Padua Hills Theater with art and music on Sunday, November 13. The Claremont Museum of Art will recreate the Art Fiesta produced annually by the Claremont artists from 1953 through 1959. This year’s event will feature an outdoor art fair with twenty invited artists showing their work, arts and craft demonstrations, folk music, festival foods and an historic display. In conjunction with the Art Fiesta, an exhibition with artworks by the original Fiesta artists will be presented in the Ginger Elliot gallery at the Garner House in Memorial Park.

The Art Fiesta will be Sunday, November 13 from 11am to 4pm at 4467 Padua Ave., Claremont. Tickets will be $8 for adults, children under 18 are free. Claremont Museum of Art members will receive a 25% discount.

ceramic_vaseTwenty area artists will display and sell their work under the beautiful shady grove of olive trees. Participating artists will include Paul Brayton, Dee Marcellus Cole, Gina Lawson Egan, Crispin Gonzales, Katherine Herrman, Mike Hill, Mary Hughes, Paul Knoll, Andree Mahoney, Sioux Bally-Maloof, Marciano and Richard Martinez, Luis Ramirez, Kazumi Kobayashi Svenson, Martha Underwood, Ahlene Welsh, Jan Wheatcroft, Rhys Williams and others.

Art and craft demonstrations by area arts organizations will captivate audiences. There will be ceramists from the AMOCA Ceramic Studios underwood_watercolor-flowersthrowing pots, craftsmen from Maloof Woodworkers, CCAA Museum of Art painters doing watercolor, Betty Davenport Ford and John Svenson will be sculpting at the the Claremont Museum of Art booth.

The CMA Family Art program will feature creative art activities for the children. A music stage will provide entertainment by local folk musicians.

Festive foods will be available from Casa de Salsa’s taco bar and Spaggi’s along with traditional Jamaica juice and fresh lemonade. Start your holiday shopping early with unique handmade artwork or art books. wooden_carvingA preview of the exhibition Claremont Modern: The Fiesta Artists 1953-1959 including historic photos and artworks by the original Fiesta artists will be on display in the Theatre dining room.

Additional photos and artist interviews available upon request.

Claremont Museum of Art and Claremont Heritage Partner for PST Celebration

logo-claremont_modernSupported by the Getty Foundation, Pacific Standard Time: Art in L.A. 1945–1980 will celebrate the vibrancy of art in the Los Angeles area with more than 30 concurrent exhibitions in an unprecedented collaboration of museums and other cultural organizations all across Southern California.

padua-harrison_mcintoshClaremont was a hot spot of artistic activity in the mid-century era. Many of the artists who studied and lived here in the 1950-60s produced outstanding work that impacted the Modernism
movement.

For this reason, Claremont Heritage and the Claremont Museum of Art have formed a partnership to produce Claremont Modern, a series of four exhibitions in the Ginger Elliot Exhibition Hall. Each exhibition will remain open for about a month with docents provided by both organizations. The second in the series will be an exhibition about the Fiesta artists of the 1950s.

Claremont Modern: The Fiesta Artists of Padua Hills 1953-1959, Nov 18-Dec 18

A preview of the exhibition will be displayed at the Art Fiesta on Sunday, November 13. It will then be relocated to the Ginger Elliot Gallery open weekends through December 18. Please join us for the opening reception on Friday November 18 from 5:30-7:30pm.

padua-watercolor with catMilford Zornes was the Director of the Padua Hills Art Institute in the 1950s and participated in the popular Art Fiesta. His daughter Maria Zornes Baker is curating the Fiesta Artists exhibition which will include historic materials and artwork from the mid-century era.

First held in 1953, the Padua Hills Art Fiesta was organized by local artists to bring art into the community. The studio art movement that flourished here in the 1950s centered on the use of natural materials and traditional sensibilities – watercolor, pottery, woodworking, sculpture in stone, bronze and ceramic, mosaic, textiles as well as painting. Visitors came from miles around to meet the artists and watch “art in action” at the popular festival.

padua-sculptureThe exhibition will feature work by many of Claremont’s well-known artists: Karl Benjamin, Paul Darrow, Betty Davenport Ford, James Hueter, Doug McClellan, Harrison McIntosh, James Strombotne, John Svenson and Jack Zajac. Sioux Bally-Maloof is producing a series of photographic portraits of these Fiesta artists. Other 1950s artists will be represented such as Rupert Deese, Phil Dike, Carl & Sue Hertel, Roger Kuntz, Sam Maloof, Walter Mix, Hildred Reents, Millard Sheets, Albert Stewart, Melvin Wood, Robert Wood and Milford Zornes. The exhibition will be accompanied by a booklet funded by the Claremont Community Foundation.

CLAREMONT MODERN: Post-War California Dreaming

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October 9–30, 2011

The annual Claremont Heritage Home Tour highlighted examples of Claremont’s exceptional and unique mid- 20th century residential architecture. The tour included a home designed by Richard Neutra and the homes of artists Karl Benjamin and Harrison McIntosh designed by Fred McDowell. David Shearer is curating the accompanying exhibition in the Ginger Elliot gallery which will look at how home design was integrated with local arts, crafts and furnishings for the modern lifestyle.

Karl Benjamin Studio

The home and studio of Karl Benjamin was on the Heritage Home tour on October 9, 2011. Photo by Louie Rios.

Claremont was fertile ground for the new thinking in art and design in the years after World War II. Hidden among the Victorian and Arts & Crafts-era homes are modernist masterpieces by the likes of Cliff May, A. Quincy Jones, Theodore Criley, Buff and Hensman and others.

The tour included homes by distinguished architects and designers such as Richard Neutra, Foster Rhodes Jackson, Fred McDowell and Everett Tozier. Significant modern artists, including painter Karl Benjamin and ceramicist Harrison McIntosh, also worked in Claremont in those years in a unique environment that fostered collaborations between artists and designers.

The remarkable confluence of these artists and architects had a profound and lasting impact upon the broader movement of Southern California Modernism. Few places of such small geographic area have produced such a plethora of outstanding work across so many disciplines as did Claremont in the 1940s, ‘50s and 60’s.

CLAREMONT MODERN: The Artists of the GI Bill

GI Bill artists(January 26, 2011) – In 2010, inspired by the Getty Foundation’s Pacific Standard Time celebration, Claremont Heritage and the Claremont Museum of Art formed a partnership to produce CLAREMONT MODERN, a series of four exhibitions in the Claremont Heritage Ginger Elliott Exhibition Space. The third in our series, CLAREMONT MODERN: The Artists of the GI Bill examines the impact of the GI Bill on the Claremont art community.

Exhibition: Open noon-5pm, through Sunday, February 26
Location: Claremont Heritage Ginger Elliott Exhibition Space, 850 N. Indian Hill Blvd., Claremont

As soldiers returned from WWII, the opportunity to study art was made possible by funding from the GI Bill. Some came to the Pomona College Art Department and stayed on. Millard Sheets developed the Graduate School Masters of Fine Art program in 1943-44 and admitted many talented GIs to study with art professors on the Scripps campus. These young men were older, more experienced with a focus and determination to pursue careers in art. The vision of Millard Sheets combined with the enthusiast energy of these GIs transformed Claremont into a vibrant art center at mid-century.Exhibition

The Exhibition

CLAREMONT MODERN: The Artists of the GI Bill focuses on a pivotal point in the history of the Claremont art community from 1945-1960. It feature Claremont area artists who served in WWII, returned to study art with funding from the GI Bill and pursued a lifetime career in the arts. It includes works by Karl Benjamin, Paul Darrow, Rupert Deese, James Fuller, James Hueter, Anthony Ivins, Roger Kuntz, Doug McClellan, Harrison McIntosh, David Scott, Paul Soldner, John Svenson, Robert E. Wood and Melvin Wood. The Exhibition is on display for eight days in the Claremont Heritage Ginger Elliott Exhibition Space located in Memorial Park behind the Garner House.

Bas Jan Ader: Suspended Between Laughter and Tears

BasJanAder-bannerr

September 30 – December 10, 2010

Pitzer College Art Galleries with the support of the Claremont Museum of Art
Pitzer Art Galleries: Nichols Gallery and Lenzner Family Gallery
Guest-curated by Pilar Tompkins Rivas

For photos of the Opening Reception, click here. http://www.flickr.com/photos/claremontmuseum/sets/72157625069927171/with/5095589772/

Thursday, October 21, 2010

Bas Jan Ader - "I'm Too Sad To Tell You," 1971 16 mm film transferred onto DVD Courtesy Bas Jan Ader Estate, Patrick Painter, Santa Monica, CA

Bas Jan Ader – “I’m Too Sad To Tell You,” 1971; 16 mm film transferred onto DVD; courtesy Bas Jan Ader Estate, Patrick Painter, Santa Monica, CA

Film Screening: Rene Daalder’s award -winning Bas Jan Ader documentary, Here is Always Somewhere Else (2008) – Broad Performance Space, Broad Center, Pitzer College

Panel discussion: A conversation between Bas Jan Ader’s widow Mary Sue Andersen, filmmaker Rene Daalder and guest curator Pilar Tompkins Rivas – Broad Performance Space, Broad Center, Pitzer College.

This exhibition brings together pivotal works by the late, Dutch-born, California-based conceptual artist, Bas Jan Ader, and ten contemporary international artists who continue to be influenced by Ader’s central themes and concerns.

Bas Jan Ader, who is presumed to have perished at sea in 1975, left a small body of work that centers on short-duration acts of physical and emotional release. It was Ader’s unique relationship to the city of Claremont, where he lived and studied from 1965 to 1974, which established his importance as a California artist. At his Claremont home, Ader executed some of his most significant works.

"Please Don’t Leave Me" (1969), Paint, light bulbs and wire, Dimensions variable, Edition of 3,  Courtesy of The Bas Jan Ader Estate & Patrick Painter Editions.

“Please Don’t Leave Me” (1969), Paint, light bulbs and wire, Dimensions variable, Edition of 3, courtesy of The Bas Jan Ader Estate & Patrick Painter Editions.

While this exhibition argues convincingly for the historical significance of Bas Jan Ader’s groundbreaking conceptual and performative work, it also makes connections to the present by the inclusion of the ten contemporary regional and international artists whose works address the legacy of Ader’s practice.

More about Ader’s Work

Suspended Between Laughter and Tears refers to Ader’s exploration of the tenuous point between comedy and tragedy in his work and provides a context for the artist’s overarching themes and strategies by addressing the living aspects of his practice. The exhibition will feature Ader’s original artworks including video, photography, installations and archived materials from his estate.

Gonzalo Lebrija, "The Distance Between Me and You" (2008), 16 mm film,  Photo: Joshua White, Courtesy of the artist and I-20 Gallery, New York.

Gonzalo Lebrija, “The Distance Between Me and You” (2008), 16 mm film. Photo: Joshua White, Courtesy of the artist and I-20 Gallery, New York.

Understanding that comedy and tragedy are aspects of the same coin, Mexico City-based artist, Artemio references Ader’s I’m Too Sad to Tell You in a video montage, The Crying Game, where the forced act of weeping in front of the camera lingers between the theatrical and the heart-felt. Los Angeles-based photographer and performance artist Martin Kersels’ suite of photographs Tripping I (a,b,c) riffs on the humorous aspect inherent in physical actions, evident in many of Ader’s works. New Zealand artist Kate Newby brings a delicate balance of melancholy and hopefulness to her installations, like Ader’s Please Don’t Leave Me, are at once a declaration to be noticed and a fleeting gesture.

Sebastian Stumpf, "marcher dans l’air" (2002), 35 mm slide projections, looped, dimensions variable, courtesy of the artist.

Sebastian Stumpf, “marcher dans l’air” (2002), 35 mm slide projections, looped, dimensions variable, courtesy of the artist.

Arguably the most influential aspect of Ader’s work lies in his final and unfinished trilogy, In Search of the Miraculous. Putting life and limb on the line for one’s art is a recurrent motivation for many artists. While Ader disappeared without a trace while executing this piece, Italian-born artist Piero Golia accomplished this feat in 2007 during his month-long performance Postcards from the Edge. Gonzalo Lebrija of Mexico follows in Ader’s footsteps on a vision quest in the photographic series The Distance Between You and Me, as he sets a lone course through deserted landscapes. Furthering the mystery of a journey on the open ocean, Brazilian artist Thiago Rocha Pitta elicits the relationship of man, the sea and the unknown elements at hand in the video The Secret Sharer. Finally, in a marked attempt to gain insight into the artist’s impossible journey, Canadian sculptor Jed Lind acquired a sailboat identical to that used by Ader in his 1975 performance, In Search of the Miraculous, and hollowed it out in a painstaking and methodical act of meditation.

Artists:  Bas Jan Ader, Artemio, Piero Golia, Martin Kersels, Gonzalo Lebrija, Jed Lind, Kate Newby, Thiago Rocha Pitta, Fernando Sanchez, Sebastian Stumpf, Diego Teo

Bas Jan Ader: Suspended Between Laughter and Tears is a joint venture between Pitzer Art Galleries and the Claremont Museum of Art and has been made possible by a generous grant from Fundación/Colección Jumex and the Consulate General of the Netherlands, San Francisco.

Claremont Museum of Art to Discontinue Operation in the Packing House

(December 22, 2009) – On December 21, the Claremont Museum of Art Board of Directors voted to discontinue operation of the Museum in The Packing House and place the permanent collection in a secure storage facility. The board will continue working to rejuvenate the Claremont Museum of Art in the next few years as the economy improves. The Museum will be open 11:00 am to 5:00 pm for two final days on December 26 and 27.

As you know, the Claremont Museum of Art nearly closed its doors in October. Thanks to funding from the City of Claremont, the Museum has remained open through 2009. For the past six weeks, a working group of board members and volunteers has been striving to find a way to move forward. The group has met twice weekly and prepared a business plan for 2010, communicated with our supporters and the media, and held several fund raising campaigns. The group determined that it would cost $213,000 to operate the Museum for one year on a modest budget with one employee and a large group of dedicated volunteers

The museum has received over $5,000 in donations from the initial letter sent to supporters. A fund raising project is underway to sell 15 ceramic Torso sculptures cast from Harrison McIntosh’s original 1940s mold for $5,000 each. So far, we have received four orders and the first castings will be completed soon after the first of the year.

An Art Book Signing event for members was held on Friday, December 11 and was well attended despite the cold wet weather. The Art Book Sale continued through the weekend and visitors made holiday ornaments at the free Family Art Day on Sunday. Thanks to many area museums and other donors, all $3,500 in proceeds from the sales will benefit the CMA. The Museum will use proceeds from the Torso and book sales to pay remaining debts.

To raise funds for our 2010 operations, The Working Group held a phone campaign and gathered over 50 pledges totaling $26,255. Unfortunately, this is only enough to remain open for six weeks. Without any immediate prospects for additional donations, we do not see any way to continue operation in The Packing House location. Therefore, pledges will not be collected. However, the Museum’s debts are not yet fully paid and there will be additional costs to move out of the current location, so supporters have been asked to turn all or part of their pledge into a donation.

The Working Group has already begun looking at ways to remain a functioning entity and to begin to restructure and rebuild. As voiced by Founding President, Marguerite McIntosh: “With a group of dedicated leaders, we shall continue as a museum without walls. We shall offer the public the best talent that Claremont has and continues to produce as a reputed center of art.” We will keep you informed as the Claremont Museum of Art moves forward.

The exhibition An Enduring Legacy: New Acquisitions to the Permanent Collection is currently on view along with Ten Pound Ape: Your Mother was Beautiful Once, part vier an interactive installation.

Museum offers free admission to Claremont residents

(November 23, 2009) – Bring your friends and family to the The Packing House this holiday weekend for a uniquely Claremont experience. 220 people visited the Claremont Museum of Art over the past two weekends since the museum extended free admission to all Claremont residents.

The exhibition An Enduring Legacy: New Acquisitions to the Permanent Collection is currently on view. This exhibition features works by many nationally recognized Claremont area artists. It is presented with the support of Gould Asset Management.

Also on view is Ten Pound Ape: Your Mother was Beautiful Once, Part Vier, an interactive installation funded by a grant from the James Irvine Foundation.

The City of Claremont has provided a grant to enable the Museum to remain in operation through the end of the year. The Claremont Museum of Art is considered an important asset to the City and a focal point of The Packing House venue.

Museum hours are Friday-Sunday 11:00 am to 5:00 pm. All Claremont residents and all children under the age of 18 are admitted free through the end of this year.

An Enduring Legacy: New Acquisitions to the Permanent Collection

September 20 – December 27, 2009

An Enduring Legacy: New Acquisitions to the Permanent Collection highlights works acquired by the Claremont Museum of Art during its first two years of existence.The exhibition includes the most recent gifts from the estate of devoted collector Marge Burgeson, and works from the exhibitions LOCUS I: Art and Craft of Claremont and the Region, Vexing: Female Voices from East L.A. Punk and Multiverse. All works represent expressions of the Museum’s mission to explore and preserve the region’s artistic talent and legacy. To date, the Museum’s permanent collection consists of paintings, works on paper, sculpture, hand‐crafted furniture and ceramics dating from the 1930s to the present.

Millard Sheets Moonlight at Barking Rocks, 1983 Watercolor on paper Gift of Ann M. Mallouk

Millard Sheets
Moonlight at Barking Rocks, 1983 Watercolor on paper Gift of Ann M. Mallouk

Artists represented in the collection include Millard Sheets, Jean Ames, Karl Benjamin, James Hueter, Harrison McIntosh and Barbara Beretich, as well as a younger generation of contemporary artists.

An Enduring Legacy: New Acquisitions to the Permanent Collection is made possible through the generous support of Gould Asset Management LLC of Claremont.