Tag Archives: Millard Sheets

MILLARD SHEETS: Hills and Horses

Millard Sheets, Detail from Horses at Play, lithograph, c.1985Sunday, November 1 at the Padua Hills Art Fiesta
Padua Hills Theatre, 4467 Padua Ave., Claremont, 11 a.m.- 4 p.m. Art Fiesta tickets are $8 for adults, $6 for CMA members. Children under 18 are free.

November 4 – February 28, 2016 at Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden
1500 N. College Ave., Claremont. Exhibition is open Daily 10 a.m.-4 p.m.
Garden admission is $8 for adults, $6 for seniors and students, $4 for children and free for CMA and RSABG members.

Inspired by a lifelong love of horses and the landscape surrounding his Padua Hills home, artist Millard Sheets depicted a familiar way of life. The exhibition Millard Sheets: Hills and Horses, curated by his son Tony Sheets, will include paintings, drawings and lithographs from the years that he lived in Padua Hills in the 1940s-60s and beyond. The exhibition is sponsored by Claremont Eye Associates, Maria (Zornes) and Hal Baker, Tony and Flower Sheets, and by Tom & Carolyn Sheets Owen-Towle.

Millard came to Claremont in 1930 to develop the fledgling art department at Scripps College and form the Graduate art program. Under his leadership, Claremont became a significant artistic center. Wanting to raise his children in the country, he purchased ten acres in the Padua Hills where so many of his artist friends lived.

As his daughter Carolyn Owen-Towle recalls in her book Damgorgeous, “Millard promptly built an enormous barn to house his thirteen horses. He built a small corral and a large paddock with an eighth mile track around it. In those days he was racing trotters at the County Fair. In 1941, just before the war began to escalate rapidly, Mary and Millard broke ground for their dream home on the hilltop of their property. Millard designed a rammed-earth dwelling with split levels, a fourteen foot flat-roofed ceiling, and floor to ceiling windows in the living room. The house had an intimate, commanding view of the San Gabriel Mountains.”

Throughout a long and prolific career, Millard Sheets was at once a painter, a muralist, an architectural designer, a teacher and art administrator, an entrepreneur, and an inspired cheerleader who tirelessly preached the importance of art in daily life. Handsome and energetic, daring and resourceful, he was a passionate ambassador for the arts.

ABOUT THE ARTIST

Born in 1907 on a ranch in Pomona, Millard Sheets showed early promise as an artist and attended Chouinard Art Institute in Los Angeles. There he became accomplished in many media – painting, printmaking, mural painting and architectural design. An early trip to Europe introduced him to German Expressionism and Turner’s watercolors. His interest in Regionalism produced paintings of rural California as well as scenes of Los Angeles in the Depression. In 1930 he arrived to develop the fledgling art department at Scripps College and form the Graduate art program. Under his leadership, Claremont became a significant artistic center. He built his house in the Padua Hills where so many of his artist friends lived.

The war years saw him designing flight-training schools and working as an artist-correspondent for Life magazine where he painted many scenes of India and Burma. After the war he returned to Scripps and the Claremont Graduate School to mentor returning GIs in their art careers. Many of these young men and women were drawn to the Abstract Expressionism and while it was not Sheet’s preferred style he encouraged them. Sheets was put in charge of the Fine Arts program at the L.A. County Fair in the early fifties and his students were put to work preparing the galleries and often being shown there. In 1953 Sheet’s became the director of the new Otis Art Institute in Los Angeles but he maintained his studio in Claremont. Here he designed many of the Home Federal Savings Banks with their stunning mosaic murals and worked with many architects on other projects. He retired to northern California where he died in 1989.

Padua Hills Art Fiesta to Feature Millard Sheets Film

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The Claremont Museum of Art will host the 12th Annual Padua Hills Art Fiesta on Sunday, November 1 with an outdoor art show, art and craft demonstrations, music and more. The recently produced film Design for Modern Living will be shown throughout the day and an exhibition will feature paintings by one of California’s most recognized artists, Millard Sheets. More information is available at www.claremontmuseum.org.

Some local residents still recall the popular Padua Hills Art Fiesta held through the 1950s. Since 2011, the Claremont Museum of Art has continued the tradition with area artists showing their work under the shady olive trees of the beautifully restored Padua Hills Theatre.

  • Sunday, November 1, 11am to 4pm at the Padua Hills Theatre, 4467 Padua Ave., Claremont. Admission is $8 for adults, $6 for CMA members. Children under 18 are free.
  • Twenty five area artists will display and sell their paintings, prints, ceramics, glass, sculpture, textiles and jewelry. Area art organizations will provide art and craft demonstrations.
  • The new documentary film Design for Modern Living: Millard Sheets and the Claremont Art Community 1935-1975 will be shown at 11:30am, 1:00pm and 2:30pm.
  • A Claremont Museum of Art exhibition, Millard Sheets: Hills and Horses will show how a love of horses inspired the artwork of Padua Hills’ artist Millard Sheets in the 1940–60s.
  • ARTstART students will lead children in creative Art Activities. A Music Stage will feature local performers. Festive foods will be served with traditional Jamaica punch and fresh lemonade.

First held in 1953, the Padua Hills Art Fiesta was organized by local artists to bring art into the community. The studio art movement that flourished here in the 1950s centered on the use of natural materials and traditional sensibilities – watercolor, pottery, woodworking, sculpture in stone, bronze and ceramic, mosaic, textiles as well as painting. Visitors came from miles around to meet the artists and watch “art in action” at the popular festival. Today the tradition continues with a new generation of artists sharing their talents.

THE ART SALE

The outdoor art show will feature twenty-five area artists showing their work under a grove of shady olive trees. New artwork this year will include paintings by Rebecca Hamm, mixed media by Sumi Foley, ceramics by Gaby Tepper and the AMOCA Ceramic Studio artists, wood turning by David Holzberger, jewelry by Jay Simmons.

And you will find many favorite returning Claremont artists: Paul Brayton, Gina Lawson Egan, Kathryn Herrman, Mike Hill, Aleta Jacobson, Andrée Mahoney, Marciano Martinez, Sherry Marger, Kathleen McCall, Maureen Wheeler, Jerry Owens, Kazumi Kabayashi Svenson, Barry Vantiger, Ahlene Welsh, Jan Wheatcroft and Susan Zenger.

THE FILM

Millard Sheets in his Padua Hills studio in the early 1950s. Photo for Life Magazine from Sheets Family Archive.

Millard Sheets in his Padua Hills studio in the early 1950s. Photo for Life Magazine from Sheets Family Archive.

Design for Modern Living: Millard Sheets and the Claremont Art Community 1935-1975

Two years in the making, the one-hour documentary film Design for Modern Living: Millard Sheets and the Claremont Art Community 1935-1975, produced by Paul Bockhorst in partnership with the Claremont Museum of Art, tells the story of the remarkable artistic community that took root at Scripps College and made Claremont an important center of Mid-20th Century Modern design.

The film provides a vivid and illuminating account of the important art community that emerged in Claremont in the years following World War II under the leadership of Millard Sheets, with profiles of nearly two dozen artists and craftspersons.

In the years following World War II, the community of Claremont in Southern California emerged as an important center for the visual arts, due in large measure to the inspired efforts of the artist and educator Millard Sheets. In Claremont, painters, sculptors, ceramists, enamel and mosaic artists, woodworkers and fiber artists devoted themselves to their creative pursuits with great imagination and energy, creating works that express the spirit of Postwar Modernism in California.

In the film, artists who were active in Claremont in the postwar period share their memories of the time and place. They include Betty Davenport Ford, John Svenson, James Strombotne, Paul Darrow, Harrison McIntosh, Barbara Beretich, and Martha Longenecker. Other artists featured in the documentary include William Manker, Jean and Arthur Ames, Albert Stewart, Henry Lee McFee, Phil Dike, Milford Zornes, James Hueter, Jack Zajac, Karl Benjamin, Roger Kuntz, Rupert Deese, Susan Hertel, and Sam Maloof.

The documentary was produced by Emmy Award-winning filmmaker Paul Bockhorst, in cooperation with the Claremont Museum of Art. A veteran writer, producer, and director, Bockhorst has produced dozens of programs that have appeared on PBS, NBC, ABC, Turner Broadcasting, and the Disney Channel. He recently received an Honorary AIA Award for his documentaries on art and architecture.

Principal funding for Design for Modern Living was provided by The Ahmanson Foundation and Howard and Roberta Ahmanson, The Windgate Charitable Foundation, Gerald and Bente Buck, E. Gene Crain, Marguerite and Harrison McIntosh, Tom & Carolyn Sheets Owen-Towle, and the Family of Helen Bockhorst. Additional support was provided by the Historical Collections Council of California, Peter and Gail Ochs, Robert and Nadine Hall, Jim and Perry Jamieson, Beverly Maloof, the Family of Karl Benjamin, and Betty Davenport Ford and Harold Ford.

THE EXHIBITION

MILLARD SHEETS: Hills and Horses

Millard Sheets, Detail from Horses at Play, lithograph, c.1985Inspired by a lifelong love of horses and the landscape surrounding his Padua Hills home, artist Millard Sheets depicted a familiar way of life. The exhibition Millard Sheets: Hills and Horses, curated by his son Tony Sheets, will include paintings, drawings and lithographs from the years that he lived in Padua Hills in the 1940s-60s and beyond.

Following the Art Fiesta, the exhibition will be on display at Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden through February 28, 2016. The exhibition is sponsored by Claremont Eye Associates, Maria (Zornes) and Hal Baker, Tony and Flower Sheets, and by Tom & Carolyn Sheets Owen-Towle.

Millard came to Claremont in 1930 to develop the fledgling art department at Scripps College and form the Graduate art program. Under his leadership, Claremont became a significant artistic center. Wanting to raise his children in the country, he purchased ten acres in the Padua Hills where so many of his artist friends lived.

As his daughter Carolyn Owen-Towle recalls in her book Damgorgeous, “Millard promptly built an enormous barn to house his thirteen horses. He built a small corral and a large paddock with an eighth mile track around it. In those days he was racing trotters at the County Fair. In 1941, just before the war began to escalate rapidly, Mary and Millard broke ground for their dream home on the hilltop of their property. Millard designed a rammed-earth dwelling with split levels, a fourteen foot flat-roofed ceiling, and floor to ceiling windows in the living room. The house had an intimate, commanding view of the San Gabriel Mountains.”

Throughout a long and prolific career, Millard Sheets was at once a painter, a muralist, an architectural designer, a teacher and art administrator, an entrepreneur, and an inspired cheerleader who tirelessly preached the importance of art in daily life. Handsome and energetic, daring and resourceful, he was a passionate ambassador for the arts.

Download a PDF of this press release.

Design for Modern Living Premieres at Garrison Theater

Film postcard frontsm

DVDs of the film Design for Modern Living are available from Paul Bockhorst Productions. BUY DVD.

Sponsored by the Claremont Museum of Art, the Clark Humanities Museum and the Ruth Chandler Williamson Gallery at Scripps College

An enthusiastic crowd of over 600 filled Garrison Theater for the premiere of Design for Modern Living: Millard Sheets and the Claremont Art Community 1935-1975 on Sunday, March 22. The one-hour documentary film, produced by Paul Bockhorst in partnership with the Claremont Museum of Art, provides a vivid and illuminating account of the important art community that emerged in Claremont in the years following World War II under the leadership of Millard Sheets, with profiles of nearly two dozen artists and craftspersons.

The premiere event, sponsored by the Claremont Museum of Art, the Clark Humanities Museum and Ruth Chandler Williamson Gallery at Scripps College, included an introduction by filmmaker Paul Bockhorst, a Q&A session and a wine reception to benefit CMA programs. Thanks to promotion sponsors Wheeler Steffen Sotheby’s International Realty and Ryan Zimmerman, Broker Associate, Wheeler Steffen Sotheby’s International Realty.

View the event photo gallery

DESIGN FOR MODERN LIVING

In the years following World War II, the community of Claremont in Southern California emerged as an important center for the visual arts, due in large measure to the inspired efforts of the artist and educator Millard Sheets. In Claremont, painters, sculptors, ceramists, enamel and mosaic artists, woodworkers and fiber artists devoted themselves to their creative pursuits with great imagination and energy, creating works that express the spirit of Postwar Modernism in California.

Design for Modern Living tells the story of the remarkable artistic community that took root at Scripps College and made Claremont an important center of Mid-20th Century Modern design.

Millard Sheets in his Padua Hills studio in the early 1950s. Photo for Life Magazine from Sheets Family Archive.

Millard Sheets in his Padua Hills studio in the early 1950s. Photo for Life Magazine from Sheets Family Archive.

“The interviews touch on all the important issues and are beautifully integrated with the historic photographs. Congratulations on a fine job extraordinarily well done!” – Harold Nelson, Curator of American Decorative Arts, The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens

In the film, artists who were active in Claremont in the postwar period share their memories of the time and place. They include Betty Davenport Ford, John Svenson, James Strombotne, Paul Darrow, Harrison McIntosh, Barbara Beretich, and Martha Longenecker. Other artists featured in the documentary include William Manker, Jean and Arthur Ames, Albert Stewart, Henry Lee McFee, Phil Dike, Milford Zornes, James Hueter, Jack Zajac, Karl Benjamin, Roger Kuntz, Rupert Deese, Susan Hertel, and Sam Maloof. Additional insights are provided by Tony Sheets, Carolyn Sheets Owen-Towle, Christy Johnson, Harold Nelson, James Elliot-Bishop, and Catherine McIntosh.

Paul Bockhorst

Paul Bockhorst

The documentary was produced by Emmy Award-winning producer Paul Bockhorst, in cooperation with the Claremont Museum of Art. A veteran writer, producer, and director, Bockhorst has produced dozens of documentary, informational, and public affairs programs that have appeared on PBS, NBC, ABC, Turner Broadcasting, and the Disney Channel. He is the recipient of numerous professional awards, including five Emmy Awards.

Principal funding for Design for Modern Living was provided by The Ahmanson Foundation and Howard and Roberta Ahmanson, The Windgate Charitable Foundation, Gerald and Bente Buck, E. Gene Crain, Marguerite and Harrison McIntosh, Tom & Carolyn Sheets Owen-Towle, and the Family of Helen Bockhorst. Additional support was provided by the Historical Collections Council of California, Peter and Gail Ochs, Robert and Nadine Hall, Jim and Perry Jamieson, Beverly Maloof, the Family of Karl Benjamin, and Betty Davenport Ford and Harold Ford.

Artists James Strombotne, Betty Davenport Ford and Paul Darrow are among the artists featured in Design for Modern Living.

Artists James Strombotne, Betty Davenport Ford and Paul Darrow are among the artists featured in “Design for Modern Living.”

CLAREMONT: A CENTER FOR MODERN DESIGN

The three decades following the end of World War II stand out as a golden age in Claremont and the surrounding Pomona Valley. The work created in that time and place gave vibrant physical expression to Southern California’s informal lifestyle, commanding both national and international attention.

American confidence was high, and so too was the desire for the good life promised in the American Dream. After fifteen long years of economic crisis and war, there was enormous pent-up demand for modern housing and well-designed home furnishings. Another important factor was the GI Bill, which allowed large numbers of returning veterans unprecedented access to higher education, including art instruction. The alignment of these factors in the late 1940s and early 1950s set the stage for an explosion in craft production in Southern California—and for Claremont’s emergence as an important center for modern design.

MILLARD SHEETS: ADVOCATE FOR THE ARTS

If the conditions were favorable for an artistic boom, a spark was still needed to ignite it. Millard Sheets was at once a painter, a muralist, an architectural designer, a teacher and art administrator, an entrepreneur, and an inspired cheerleader who tirelessly preached the importance of art in daily life. Handsome and energetic, daring and resourceful, he was a passionate ambassador for the arts. Sheets began by creating the art department at Scripps College and the Claremont Graduate School in the 1930-40s. He went on to develop the Art Department at the Los Angeles County Fair, planned and designed dozens of Home Savings & Loan Association branches throughout California, and became a powerful voice for the arts in the Southland.

We were pleased to premiere this film on Sunday, March 22, 2015 at Garrison Theater, a structure designed by Millard Sheets in 1962 featuring his distinctive mosaic murals.

Garrison Theater skinnysm

Garrison Theater at Scripps College

PAUL BOCKHORST: PRODUCER‘S STATEMENT

Paul Bockhorst, a veteran writer, producer, and director, has produced dozens of programs that have appeared on PBS, NBC, ABC, Turner Broadcasting, and the Disney Channel. He recently received an Honorary AIA Award for his many documentaries on art and architecture.

I have long been fascinated by the unique art community that developed in Claremont in the years following World War II. I’ve often marveled at the wide range of art and craft produced there and the high caliber of that work. Artists like Millard Sheets, William Manker, Albert Stewart, Betty Davenport Ford, Karl Benjamin, Jack Zajac, Roger Kuntz, Harrison McIntosh, and Sam Maloof set high standards and made Claremont a major center for art, craft, and architecture in the postwar period. Several times over the years I considered making a documentary about that community, with an emphasis on the leadership role played by Millard Sheets. Then, in 2012, I realized the urgency of the project and the need to act while a number of artists from that period were still able to provide firsthand accounts. To that end, I joined forces with the Claremont Museum of Art and embarked upon the production of a major documentary.

The first priority was to locate and interview surviving artists from the 1950s and 60s. Many were elderly, and it was important to move quickly to capture their memories. After securing a research grant from the Windgate Charitable Foundation, I proceeded to conduct interviews with a number of artists. They provided vivid and illuminating perspectives on what has been called the golden age of art in Claremont. People interviewed in the initial phase of the project included John Svenson, Betty Davenport Ford, Harrison McIntosh, Martha Longenecker, Paul Darrow, James Strombotne, Tony Sheets, Carolyn Sheets Owen-Towle, Rufus Turner, and Barbara Beretich, among others.

As I pursued the project, I found an enormous amount of material—so much, in fact, that the scope and complexity of the story seemed to expand with every step I took. I realized that there was too much material for a single one-hour documentary. After consulting with project partners, I decided to divide the material and make not one, but two documentaries. The first, Design for Modern Living: Millard Sheets and the Claremont Art Community, 1935-1975, focuses on art and craft in Claremont, and is being done in cooperation with the Claremont Museum of Art. The second documentary, Claremont Modern: The Convergence of Art + Architecture at Midcentury, is being produced in association with Claremont Heritage. It examines modern architecture and design. Together, the two documentaries provide a comprehensive panorama of art, craft, architecture, and design in Claremont in the postwar period.

Film Premiere Celebrates Claremont’s Unique Artistic Legacy

Press Contact: Catherine McIntosh
909 626-1386, cell 713 829-9338
cmcintosh1011@gmail.com

Claremont, Calif. (February 18, 2015) – Design for Modern Living: Millard Sheets and the Claremont Art Community 1935-1975 will premiere at 3 p.m. Sunday, March 22, at Garrison Theater at Scripps College, 231 East 10th St. in Claremont. The event is sponsored by the Claremont Museum of Art and by the Clark Humanities Museum and Ruth Chandler Williamson Gallery at Scripps College.

Two years in the making, the one-hour documentary film, produced by Paul Bockhorst in partnership with the Claremont Museum of Art, provides a vivid and illuminating account of the important art community that emerged in Claremont in the years following World War II under the leadership of Millard Sheets, with profiles of nearly two dozen artists and craftspersons.

Be among the first to see this important new chronicle of Claremont history!

The premiere event will include an introduction by filmmaker Paul Bockhorst, a Q&A session and a wine and hors d’oeuvres reception to benefit CMA programs. Advance tickets are available for $20 online at www.claremontmuseum.org or you may make your reservation by sending a check to Claremont Museum of Art, P.O. Box 1136, Claremont CA 91711. Admission will be $25 at the door.

DESIGN FOR MODERN LIVING

In the years following World War II, the community of Claremont in Southern California emerged as an important center for the visual arts, due in large measure to the inspired efforts of the artist and educator Millard Sheets. In Claremont, painters, sculptors, ceramists, enamel and mosaic artists, woodworkers and fiber artists devoted themselves to their creative pursuits with great imagination and energy, creating works that express the spirit of Postwar Modernism in California.

Design for Modern Living tells the story of the remarkable artistic community that took root at Scripps College and made Claremont an important center of Mid-20th Century Modern design.

“The interviews touch on all the important issues and are beautifully integrated with the historic photographs. Congratulations on a fine job extraordinarily well done!”
– Harold Nelson, Curator of American Decorative Arts, The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens.

In the film, artists who were active in Claremont in the postwar period share their memories of the time and place. They include Betty Davenport Ford, John Svenson, James Strombotne, Paul Darrow, Harrison McIntosh, Barbara Beretich, and Martha Longenecker. Other artists featured in the documentary include William Manker, Jean and Arthur Ames, Albert Stewart, Henry Lee McFee, Phil Dike, Milford Zornes, James Hueter, Jack Zajac, Karl Benjamin, Roger Kuntz, Rupert Deese, Susan Hertel, and Sam Maloof. Additional insights are provided by Tony Sheets, Carolyn Sheets Owen-owle, Christy Johnson, Harold Nelson, James Elliot-Bishop, and Catherine McIntosh.

The documentary was produced by Emmy Award-winning filmmaker Paul Bockhorst, in cooperation with the Claremont Museum of Art. A veteran writer, producer, and director, Bockhorst has produced dozens of programs that have appeared on PBS, NBC, ABC, Turner Broadcasting, and the Disney Channel. He recently received an Honorary AIA Award for his many documentaries on art and architecture.

Principal funding for Design for Modern Living was provided by The Ahmanson Foundation and Howard and Roberta Ahmanson, The Windgate Charitable Foundation, Gerald and Bente Buck, E. Gene Crain, Marguerite and Harrison McIntosh, Tom & Carolyn Sheets Owen-Towle, and the Family of Helen Bockhorst. Additional support was provided by the Historical Collections Council of California, Peter and Gail Ochs, Robert and Nadine Hall, Jim and Perry Jamieson, Beverly Maloof, the Family of Karl Benjamin, and Betty Davenport Ford and Harold Ford.

CLAREMONT: A CENTER FOR MODERN DESIGN

The three decades following the end of World War II stand out as a golden age in Claremont and the surrounding Pomona Valley. The work created in that time and place gave vibrant physical expression to Southern California’s informal lifestyle, commanding both national and international attention.

American confidence was high, and so too was the desire for the good life promised in the American Dream. After fifteen long years of economic crisis and war, there was enormous pent-up demand for modern housing and well-designed home furnishings. Another
important factor was the GI Bill, which allowed large numbers of returning veterans unprecedented access to higher education, including art instruction. The alignment of these factors in the late 1940s and early 1950s set the stage for an explosion in craft production in Southern California —and for Claremont’s emergence as an important center for modern design.

MILLARD SHEETS: ADVOCATE FOR THE ARTS

Millard Sheets in his Padua Hills studio in the early 1950s. Photo for Life Magazine from Sheets Family Archive.

Millard Sheets in his Padua Hills studio in the early 1950s. Photo from the Sheets Family Archive.

If the conditions were favorable for an artistic boom, a spark was still needed to ignite it. Millard Sheets was at once a painter, a muralist, an architectural designer, a teacher and art administrator, an entrepreneur, and an inspired cheerleader who tirelessly preached the importance of art in daily life. Handsome and energetic, daring and resourceful, he was a passionate ambassador for the arts. Sheets began by creating the art department at Scripps College and the Claremont Graduate School in the 1930-40s. He went on to develop the Art Department at the Los Angeles County Fair, planned and designed dozens of Home Savings & Loan Association branches throughout California, and became a powerful voice for the arts in the Southland.

We are pleased to premiere this film at Garrison Theater, a structure designed by Millard Sheets in 1962 featuring his distinctive mosaic murals.

Photos and interview opportunities are available upon request.

Design for Living PDF

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CLAREMONT MODERN: The Artists of the GI Bill

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February 17-26, 2012

In 2010, inspired by the Getty Foundation’s Pacific Standard Time celebration, Claremont Heritage and the Claremont Museum of Art formed a partnership to produce CLAREMONT MODERN, a series of four exhibitions in the Claremont Heritage Ginger Elliott Exhibition Space.

The third in our series, CLAREMONT MODERN: The Artists of the GI Bill examined the impact of the GI Bill on the Claremont art community.

As soldiers returned from WWII, the opportunity to study art was made possible by funding from the GI Bill. Some came to the Pomona College Art Department and stayed on. Millard Sheets developed the Graduate School Masters of Fine Art program in 1943-44 and admitted many talented GIs to study with art professors on the Scripps campus. These young men were older, more experienced with a focus and determination to pursue careers in art. The vision of Millard Sheets combined with the enthusiast energy of these GIs transformed Claremont into a vibrant art center at mid-century.

The Exhibition CLAREMONT MODERN: The Artists of the GI Bill focused on a pivotal point in the history of the Claremont art community from 1945-1960. It featured Claremont area artists who served in WWII, returned to study art with funding from the GI Bill and pursued a lifetime career in the arts.

It included works by Karl Benjamin, Paul Darrow, Rupert Deese, Carl Hertel, James Hueter, Anthony Ivins, Roger Kuntz, Doug McClellan, Harrison McIntosh, David Scott, Paul Soldner, John Svenson and Melvin Wood. The Exhibition was displayed for eight days in the Claremont Heritage Ginger Elliott Exhibition Space located in Memorial Park behind the Garner House.

A “Damngorgeous” Evening – Celebrating the Vision of Millard Sheets to be held on September 10, 2011

sheets_home(August 29, 2011) – We invite you to cover the Claremont Museum of Art gala on September 10 at the home of Dr. Gerald and Barbara Friedman in Padua Hills. Guests will be among the first to see this exquisite home come back to life. You will have the opportunity to learn more about the history of the Millard Sheets house and the revival of the Claremont Museum of Art. Cocktails from 5:00, seated dinner at 7:00pm,speakers will begin at 7:45pm.

Home to the Sheets family in 1940s-60s, the house burned in the 2003 wildfire. Working from the original Millard Sheet plans, the Friedmans have rebuilt the house, which features stunning architecture, expansive patios and a sweeping view of the foothills.

Millard Sheets was one of the most important and influential artists to emerge from the fertile Pomona Valley. His son Tony and daughter Carolyn will share Millard’s vision and stories of his life in Padua Hills with us. A special display will feature historic articles and photographs. For the art lover, there will be unique auction items including mid-century artworks such as a Millard Sheets lithograph and a Harrison McIntosh bowl. Carolyn Sheets Owen-Towle will have her recent book, DAMNGORGEOUS: A Daughter’s Memoir of Millard Owen Sheets, available for signing.

Special thanks to our sponsors and underwriters Chef Henry Gonzales of Spaggi’s, Marguerite McIntosh, Barbara Brown, John Maguire, Janet Myhre, Gould Asset Management, LLC and Sandy
Baldonado. And we appreciate the support of A-1 Eagle Sedan Service, Brad & Maryanne Blaine, Bunny Gunner Art Services, RP Johnson, Liquorama, Dr. Ali & Stephanie Mesiwala, Maloof Foundation, Mellon, Johnson & Reardon CPAs LLP, Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden, Michael & Karen Rosenthal.

Special parking instructions: Guests have been instructed to park at Vail Park, 2400 Grand Ave., Claremont. From Foothill go north on Mills Ave., turn right on Miramar Ave. and right on Grand Ave. A free shuttle service will transport you to the Friedman home at 4003 Via Padova in Padua Hills. There is very limited parking along the street and it is treacherous for pedestrians.

An Enduring Legacy: New Acquisitions to the Permanent Collection

September 20 – December 27, 2009

An Enduring Legacy: New Acquisitions to the Permanent Collection highlights works acquired by the Claremont Museum of Art during its first two years of existence.The exhibition includes the most recent gifts from the estate of devoted collector Marge Burgeson, and works from the exhibitions LOCUS I: Art and Craft of Claremont and the Region, Vexing: Female Voices from East L.A. Punk and Multiverse. All works represent expressions of the Museum’s mission to explore and preserve the region’s artistic talent and legacy. To date, the Museum’s permanent collection consists of paintings, works on paper, sculpture, hand‐crafted furniture and ceramics dating from the 1930s to the present.

Millard Sheets Moonlight at Barking Rocks, 1983 Watercolor on paper Gift of Ann M. Mallouk

Millard Sheets
Moonlight at Barking Rocks, 1983 Watercolor on paper Gift of Ann M. Mallouk

Artists represented in the collection include Millard Sheets, Jean Ames, Karl Benjamin, James Hueter, Harrison McIntosh and Barbara Beretich, as well as a younger generation of contemporary artists.

An Enduring Legacy: New Acquisitions to the Permanent Collection is made possible through the generous support of Gould Asset Management LLC of Claremont.

Claremont Museum of Art Unveils Community-Based Abstract Installation on Saturday, May 3rd

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Claremont, CA (April 22, 2008) — The Claremont Museum of Art is pleased to present a unique community-based abstract installation project, to be unveiled on Saturday, May 3rd in the courtyard on the east side of the Claremont Packing House.

The installation will be comprised of more than 80 painted panels created by children and adults, who were led by artist Janna Geary at the Museum’s April 12th Family Art Day. Geary has taken these panels and pieced them together using brass inserts and capscrews to create a one-of-a-kind Abstract Expressionist composition, which she will mount on the eight-foot-long wall in the Packing House courtyard. The community is invited to view this unique community project, on view through mid-June.

“This project is part of our ongoing ‘community engagement’ imitative,” said the CMA’s Executive Director William Moreno. “It is the second such installation – following the popular PhotoBooth – and we have many more planned in the future. I believe it’s important for museums to be centers of activity, and think this mural project, created by a variety of community members, fits that objective.

Los Angeles-based Abstract Expressionist artist Janna Geary is a Fine Arts/Illustration graduate of the Kendall College of Art and Design in Grand Rapids, MI, and has exhibited in many solo and group exhibitions, including Rockin’ for Peace at the House of Blues in L.A. in 2007, and the Los Angeles Open at Barnsdall Park in Hollywood in 2004. She has conducted several artmaking workshops for children of all ages. Geary said of her work; “The purpose of my art is to be a kind of ‘social therapy’ that functions through acknowledging experiences, emotions, or subject matter that is uncomfortable, and then re-presenting it to my audience in a matter in which they are forced to observe…sometimes through a different perspective, and sometimes through their own.”

Also coming up at the Claremont Museum of Art:

Saturday, April 26, 3 p.m.
REMINISCENCES: E. Gene Crain discusses several First Generation artists
Free for Museum Members, $5 for non-members (includes gallery admission)
E. Gene Crain, collector and friend to many of the First Generation artists, shares stories of his friendship with Millard Sheets, Phil Dike, and others, and discusses the history of his collection, widely acknowledged as one of the world’s most comprehensive collections of work by artists from the “California School.” First Generation Guest Curator Steve Comba hosts.

Sunday, April 27, 11 a.m. – 5 p.m.
FIRST GENERATION EXHIBITION CLOSING
Join us for the final day of the remarkable exhibition First Generation: Art in Claremont, 1907-1957, which traces the art history of the region in the first 50 years after the city’s incorporation in 1907.

About the Museum
The Claremont Museum of Art seeks to serve a diverse public as a regional museum of international significance and breadth. Grounded in Claremont’s important artistic legacy, the Museum engages artists and audiences through a compelling program of exhibitions and educational programs that connect the visual arts with contemporary life. In addition to a diverse slate of exhibitions, the Museum features an eclectic store offering contemporary and unexpected gifts from around the world. A comprehensive slate of educational programming and events are offered for all ages. Claremont Museum of Art is an independent, nonprofit 501(c)(3) organization.

First Generation: Art in Claremont 1907-1957

January 27 – April 27, 2008

On a clear day a century ago, one could see the peak of Mt. Baldy from virtually every corner of the Los Angeles basin, from ocean to desert. The original inhabitants of this area, the Tongva/Gabrielino Indians, called the mountain “Yoát,” or snow. Its siren song has drawn generations of settlers to its shadow. Since the late 19th century, prominent artists have been among those attracted to the foothills of Mt. Baldy and its neighboring peaks – and the city of Claremont, in particular. Whether it was the allure of the “great bald mountain” and its surrounding chaparral that first attracted painters and photographers to Claremont, or the opportunities provided by the birth of the schools and colleges founded to serve a rapidly growing population, a large number of distinguished visual artists settled here, greatly enriching the culture of the region and establishing early-on its prominence as an artistic haven.

First Generation traced the art history of the region, from the work of such artists as Hannah Tempest Jenkins, Emil Kosa, Jr., and William Manker to that of Millard Sheets and his circle in the 1930s. Sheets’s influence as artist and teacher extended as well to bringing artists such as Henry Lee McFee, Phil Dike, and Jean Ames to Scripps College, thereby enhancing the existing art community and assuring its lasting influence. “This exhibition includes the work of these and other artists important to Claremont’s history and reflects the conviction on which the Claremont Museum of Art is based,” said First Generation Guest Curator Steve Comba. “That Claremont’s artistic heritage is a rich and valuable resource for both present and future generations, one that deserves to be examined and celebrated.”