Tag Archives: Packing House

Claremont Museum of Art Presents VELOCITY 2007, a Contemporary Art Auction Saturday, November 17

(November 8, 2007)—The Claremont Museum of Art presents its first annual contemporary art auction, VELOCITY 2007, on Saturday, November 17, 2007. The evening, which benefits the Museum’s exhibitions and programs, is dedicated to the work and vision of Milford Zornes on the occasion of his Centennial celebration.

VELOCITY 2007 offers art enthusiasts an exceptional opportunity to bid on art from established and emerging artists working in a variety of media.

The silent auction and reception take place from 7 to 8:30 p.m., and the live auction program is from 8:30 to 10 p.m. Guests will enjoy hors d’ oeuvres by Three Forks and a hosted bar throughout the evening. Music will feature the sounds of Refugio Latin Jazz Trio.

Attendees will also be engaged with Fotoaktion, an interactive photography project by San Diego-based artist Perry Vasquez. With Fotoaktion, Vasquez bring the props, costumes, lights, and camera, and event attendees dress up and trip their own photo.

The following artists generously donated artworks for this event: Fumiko Amano, Dawn Arrowsmith, Ellen Babcock, Karl Benjamin, Barbara Beretich, Enrique Castrej_n, Steve Comba, Hollis Cooper, Zoe Crosher, Paul Darrow, Luis Delgado, Ron Feldman, James Fuller, Margaret Gallegos, Gary Geraths, Ed Gomez, Crispin Gonzalez, Rebecca Hamm, Angela Hennessy, Tom Herberg, Luis Hernandez, Germ_n Herrera, Janice Hoffmann, James Hueter, Christopher Irion, Ellen Jantzen, Kevan Jenson, Jennifer Kaufman, Ken Johnson, Kristie Lippire, Miguel Lopez, John Lucas, Andree Mahoney, Jerome Edward Mahoney, Jane Marquis, Rebecca Martinez, Harrison McIntosh, Blue McRight, Rebecca Miller, Miguel Osuna, Vincent Ramos, Roland Reiss, Albert Reyes, James Sansing, Martha Saudek, Elizabeth Sides-Preston, David Svenson, John Svenson, Ruth Trotter, Linda Vallejo, Perry Vasquez, Matt Wardell, Antrese Wood, Michael Woodcock, Suzan Woodruff, Liat Yossifor, Connie Zehr.

Auction tickets and packages begin at $100 per person. Event access also includes entry to the Auction Preview on Friday, November 16, 2007, from 6 to 8 p.m., which marks the official opening of the silent bidding.

To compliment the Art Auction, on Tuesday, November 13, 2007, from 6 to 8 p.m., Museum Executive Director William Moreno, Curator Pilar Tompkins, and Claremont Fine Arts President Mike Verbal will lead a panel discussion on approaches to collecting art. General admission is $5.00, and members are admitted free.

A special High Speed package is available for $1,000 and includes: a special listing in the event program book; six tickets to the auction, preview, and panel discussion; and a Sustaining Museum Membership (a $500 value) with a wide variety of benefits and activities.

For more information or to purchase tickets, please contact Evonne Gallardo, the Museum’s Director of Development, at (909) 621-3200 ext. 103 or info@claremontmuseum.org. All
proceeds benefit the Claremont Museum of Art’s exhibits and programs and are tax deductible to the extent permitted by law.

All events take place at the Claremont Museum of Art, located at 536 West First Street inside the Packing House.

About the Museum: The Claremont Museum of Art is a regional museum of international significance, exhibiting art connected to Claremont as well as art from around the world. In
addition to a diverse slate of exhibits, the museum features an eclectic store offering contemporary and unexpected gifts from around the world. A comprehensive slate of educational programming and events are offered for all ages. Claremont Museum of Art is an independent, nonprofit 501(c)(3) organization.

On View Through December 30: The Claremont Museum of Art presents Ephemeral: Explorations in Light, a multi-media show on light featuring dynamic installations and sculptures by Iñaki Bonillas (Mexico City), Elaine Buckholtz (San Francisco), Thomas Glassford (Mexico City), Won Ju Lim (Los Angeles), and C.E.B. Reas (Los Angeles).

Multiverse

September 21, 2008 – February 1, 2009

Read “Conversations between Art and Science,” conversations between Multiverse artists and Claremont scholars.

Multiverse refers to the hypothesis that all of physical reality actually exists within a set of multiple, parallel universes, of which our universe is merely one part. The possibility of many universes raises a myriad of scientific, philosophical and theological questions that have been explored in various branches of theoretical science, disciplines of thought and fiction. Multiverse will explore these issues artistically in a dynamic exhibition featuring photographic installations, mixed media sculptures, video projections, a light box installation, and sculpture from paper, among other media.

Artists continually create a visual vocabulary for themselves that parallels and portrays an idealized, imagined or fantasized reality. Nature and its mysteries provide endless departure points for fictitious imagery that is recognizable enough to have relevance, yet abstract enough to interrupt familiarity and probe deeper into our psyches. From chimera to corporeality, Multiverse delves into alternative outcomes for the universe we believe exists in singularity. “This exhibition represents the Museum’s interest in ideas that connect the arts and artists to contemporary thinking and points-of-view,” said CMA Director William Moreno. “Exploring these provocative ideas creates an opportunity for interdisciplinary discourse.”

Participating artists include Sebastiaan Bremer (New York), Jedediah Caesar (Los Angeles), Emilie Halpern (Los Angeles), Violet Hopkins (Los Angeles), Emre Hüner (Istanbul, Turkey), Miler Lagos (Bogotá, Colombia), Nancy Macko (Claremont), Carter Mull (Los Angeles), Diana Thater (Los Angeles), Fred Tomaselli (New York), and Kerry Tribe (Los Angeles). Multiverse artists will engage in an email exchange with local scholars, discussing particular areas of science, psychology or the discipline of his/her choice, which will then be incorporated into the exhibition. Multiverse is curated by Pilar Tompkins.

The Passerby Museum

September 21, 2008 – February 1, 2009

The Passerby Museum makes its Southern California debut in Claremont! Created in 2002 by María Alós and Nicolás Dumit Estévez in New York City, The Passerby Museum is an itinerant institution dedicated to presenting temporary exhibitions in different cities. The museum draws its collection from donations from people who visit, work or live where it is in operation at any given time, including about 400 objects recently collected at two locations in Claremont.

The Passerby Museum has been presented in Madrid, Spain, Puebla, México, Kitchener, Canada, New York, New York and twice in México City, Mexico and Havana, Cuba. At each location, visitors were asked to donate any random object from their life to the Passerby Museum’s “collection.” The only requirement is that the object fit into a sandwich bag. Its collection – which currently holds about 3,000 objects – has been exhibited to the public in two occasions, last time in 2006, bringing more than 32,000 visitors to the Galería del Ayuntamiento (Puebla) in less than a month and a half. The installation will include each of the approximately 3,000 items collected at all of the locations so far, including the approximately 400 items collected in Claremont.

Claremont Museum of Art Hosts Summer Events to Complement Vexing: Female Voices from East LA Punk

banner-vexing

Butchlalis de Panochtitlan, photo courtesy of Hector Silva
Two images from the Vexing installation

Claremont, CA (June 6, 2008) — The Claremont Museum of Art is pleased to present a full slate of summer programs for the whole family to complement Vexing: Female Voices from East LA Punk, which runs until August 31, 2008.

Sunday, June 15, 12 – 4 p.m.
Family Art Day: “Stenciled t-shirts”
Free and open to the public
Celebrate Father’s Day and make a t-shirt for Dad! Screen print artist John E. Miner will show you how. Miner studied silkscreen techniques under the tutelage of Richard S. Duardo and is an adjunct professor at Pasadena City College where he teaches graphic design and silkscreening.

Saturday, June 21, 7:30 – 8:30 p.m.
Butchlalis de Panochtitlan: “The Barber of East L.A.”
Free for Museum Members, $5 for non-members
Don’t miss excerpts and monologues from “The Barber of East L.A.,” the first full-length play by Butchlalis de Panochtitlan (BdP), a multimedia performance ensemble comprised of Mari Garcia, Raquel Gutierrez and Claudia Rodriguez. In “The Barber of East L.A.,” directed by MacArthur Fellow Luis Alfaro, BdP calls queer Chicano history into question while tipping its hat to the Chicano punk scene and the rise of such grassroots spaces as Self Help Graphics.

Framed historically by the Chicano moratorium against the Vietnam War, the death of Ruben Salazar and the impending election of Ronald Reagan, “The Barber of East L.A.” is a story about outsider Latinos living in East L.A. neighborhoods, combining fictional characters with real events against a tumultuous period of the recent past.

Saturday, July 12, 3 p.m.
Film Screening: “Pretty Vacant”
Free for Museum Members, $5 for non-members
Molly “La Molly” Vasquez – perennial junior college art student, drummer for an all-girl band and Sex Pistols devotee – is on deadline to finish her self-published underground Chicano ‘zine. Directed by Jim Mendiola, 33 min.

Sunday, July 20, 12 – 4 p.m.
Family Art Day: “Making Music”
Free and open to the public
Let the muse in you speak through music. From punk to folk, music therapist and audio producer Venus Kitagowa-Stojsik will work with children and family members to create original musical experiences.

Sunday, August 17, 12 – 4 p.m.
Family Art Day: “Pins”
Free and open to the public
Have something to say? Say it on a pin! We’ll help you design your own custom pin.

Saturday, August 30, 8 p.m.
Live Performance: “Sirens” and “Go Betty Go”
Free for Museum Members, $5 for non-members
Two all-girl L.A. bands come together for a lively performance! The spunky and aggressive pop-punk band Go Betty Go and all-girl rock/punk/Spanish fusion quartet The Sirens perform together for this final weekend of Vexing.

About Vexing

Vexing is an historical investigation of the women at the forefront of the punk rock scene in East L.A. in the 1970s and ’80s. The exhibition features photo, video and audio archives of the era as well as studio work encompassing painting, installation, writings and performance.
Participants include musicians Alice Bag, Teresa Covarrubias, Angela Vogel, Monica Flores, musician and artist Exene Cervenka, artists Diane Gamboa and Patssi Valdez, photographers Dawn Wirth, Louis Jacinto, Linda Posnick and Frank Gargani, recording label founder of Fatima Records Yolanda Comparan Ferrer, printmakers Richard Duardo, Jessee Vidaurre and John Miner, and filmmaker Jimmy Mendiola. Representing a newer generation of artistic producers
influenced by these women are musician/artist Lysa Flores, artists Shizu Saldamando and Sandra de la Loza, photographer Chris TV, performance group Butchlalis de Panochtitlan, and bands The Sirens and Go Betty Go.

Research and reproduction support provided by the Chicano Studies Research Center at UCLA. This exhibition is cocurated by Pilar Tompkins and Colin Gunckel. A catalog will accompany the exhibition, with essays by Josh Kun, Michelle Habell-Pallán, Isabel Castro-Melendez, Colin Gunckel and Pilar Tompkins.

Accompanying Vexing

Zoe Crosher: The Reconsidered Archive of Michelle du Bois

Three images from The Reconsidered Archive of Michelle du Bois

Three images from The Reconsidered Archive of Michelle du Bois

In the 1970s and ‘80s, an American woman named Michelle du Bois traveled alone through cities in the Pacific Rim and documented her highly sexual and liberated lifestyle, collecting hundreds of tourist photographs, family snapshots, and risqué images of herself – and her alter egos. In The Reconsidered Archive of Michelle du Bois, artist Zoe Crosher has manipulated these archived materials to elicit various narratives from within du Bois’s complex process of autodocumentation.
In Crosher’s photographic groupings, Du Bois is heroine and ingénue, toying with persona, fetishism and exoticism. A distinct portrait of a woman emerges, one that is tied to the women’s and sexual liberation movements of the era, while revealing the vulnerability that accompanies the trappings of her lifestyle and her slippery identity.

Zoe Crosher is a Los Angeles-based artist who received her MFA from CalArts in Valencia and her BA from UC Santa Cruz. Selected exhibitions include: 1-Yr Later, Diverseworks, Houston and DEleanor Hardwood Gallery, San Francisco; OUT THE WINDOW (LAX) at DCKT Contemporary, NY and Small A Projects, Portland, OR; Small Things Fail, Great Things Endure, New Langton Arts, San Francisco, CA and Re-Make, Re-Model, d’Amelio Terras, New York, NY.

Maya Schindler: Blah, Blah, Blah Revolution

Three images from Blah, Blah, Blah Revolution

Three images from Blah, Blah, Blah Revolution

Frequently employing play on words, Maya Schindler’s work ranges from the fanciful to the political. The artist’s witty, text-based sculptures and wall pieces beckon the viewer to activate the works by enunciating the phrase presented. Blah, Blah, Blah Revolution is an outdoor sculptural piece that utilizes scale and material to further the irony of a juxtaposition of apathy and activism.

Maya Schindler is a Los Angeles-based artist originally from Jerusalem, Israel. She received her MFA from Yale University and her BFA from the Bezalel Academy of Art and Design in Jerusalem, and attended the CORE program in Houston. Recent solo exhibitions include The Miller Gallery at Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburg, THE NEW DEAL at Anna Helwing Gallery, Los Angeles, and In Confidence at South First in Brooklyn.

About the Museum: The Claremont Museum of Art seeks to serve a diverse public as a regional museum of international significance and breadth. Grounded in Claremont’s important artistic legacy, the Museum engages artists and audiences through a compelling program of exhibitions and educational programs that connect the visual arts with contemporary life. In addition to a diverse slate of exhibitions, the museum features an eclectic store offering contemporary and unexpected gifts from around the world. A comprehensive slate of educational programming and events are offered for all ages. Claremont Museum of Art is an independent, nonprofit 501(c)(3) organization.

Vexing: Female Voices from East LA Punk

May 18 – August 31, 2008

The burgeoning punk rock music scene of the late 1970s and early 1980s in East Los Angeles provided an electrically charged, creative climate. This scene created an atmosphere where performance mixed with poetry, and visual culture was defined by an aesthetic and an attitude. Artists and musicians interfaced and blurred the lines of actions, documentation, photography, sound and style. Taking its name from the all-ages music club The Vex, once housed within East Los Angeles’ Self Help Graphics and Art, Vexing: Female Voices from East L.A. Punk is an historical investigation of the women who were at the forefront of this movement of experimentation in music, art, culture and politics, while exploring their lasting legacies and contemporary practices. This documentary-style exhibition will include photo, video and audio archives of the era as well as studio work encompassing painting, installation, writings and performance.

In an artistic environment fueled by exchange and experimentation, music played a pivotal role in defining new images of self. This exhibition documents a vital moment of artistic and musical interchange in Los Angeles, with women staking out a position between and within punk rock, East LA and the downtown art scene. Vexing not only considers their significant contributions to the cultural landscape of LA, but also examines the multiple scenes and identities they negotiated. These women have also served as a model for subsequent generations interested in alternative social movements as a platform of expression, as well as the post-identity conceptual practices of today.

Participants include musicians Alice Bag, Teresa Covarrubias, Angela Vogel, Monica Flores, musician and artist Exene Cervenka, artists Diane Gamboa and Patssi Valdez, photographers Dawn Wirth, Louis Jacinto, Linda Posnick and Frank Gargani, recording label founder of Fatima Records Yolanda Comparan Ferrer, printmakers Richard Duardo, Jessee Vidaurre and John Miner, and filmmaker Jimmy Mendiola. Representing a newer generation of artistic producers influenced by these women are musician/artist Lysa Flores, artists Shizu Saldamando and Sandra de la Loza, photographer Chris TV, performance group Butchlalis de Panochtitlan, and bands The Sirens and Go Betty Go. Vexing also includes special concert footage and interviews courtesy of Pete Galindo, Willie Herrón and Lysa Flores from the forthcoming documentary on The Vex, and an excerpt from the forthcoming documentary “Eastside Punks” by Jimmy Alvarado, Pat Perez and Jake Smith.

Research and reproduction support provided by the Chicano Studies Research Center at UCLA. This exhibition is co-curated by Pilar Tompkins and Colin Gunckel. A catalog will accompany the exhibition, with essays by Josh Kun, Michelle Habell-Pallán, Isabel Castro-Melendez, Colin Gunckel and Pilar Tompkins.

Maya Schindler: Blah, Blah, Blah Revolution

May 18 – August 31, 2008

Frequently employing play on words, Maya Schindler’s work ranges from the fanciful to the political. The artist’s witty, text-based sculptures and wall pieces beckon the viewer to activate the works by enunciating the phrase presented. Blah, Blah, Blah Revolution is an outdoor sculptural piece that utilizes scale and material to further the irony of a juxtaposition of apathy and activism.

Maya Schindler is a Los Angeles-based artist originally from Jerusalem, Israel. She received her MFA from Yale University and her BFA from the Bezalel Academy of Art and Design in Jerusalem, and attended the CORE program in Houston. Recent solo exhibitions include The Miller Gallery at Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburg, THE NEW DEAL at Anna Helwing Gallery, Los Angeles, and In Confidence at South First in Brooklyn.

Zoe Crosher: The Reconsidered Archive of Michelle du Bois

May 18 – August 31, 2008

In the 1970s and ‘80s, an American woman named Michelle du Bois traveled alone through cities in the Pacific Rim and documented her highly sexual and liberated lifestyle, collecting hundreds of tourist photographs, family snapshots, and risque images of herself – and her alter egos. In The Reconsidered Archive of Michelle du Bois, artist Zoe Crosher has manipulated these archived materials to elicit various narratives from within du Bois’s complex process of auto-documentation. In Crosher’s photographic groupings, Du Bois is both heroine and ingénue, toying with persona, identity, fetishism and exoticism. A distinct portrait of a woman emerges, one tied to the women’s and sexual liberation movements of the era, while revealing the vulnerability that accompanies the trappings of her lifestyle and her slippery identity.

Zoe Crosher is a Los Angeles-based artist. She received her MFA from CalArts in Valencia, CA and her BA from UC Santa Cruz. Selected exhibitions include: 1-Yr Later, Diverseworks, Houston and DEleanor Hardwood Gallery, San Francisco; OUT THE WINDOW (LAX) at DCKT Contemporary, NY and Small A Projects, Portland, OR; Small Things Fail, Great Things Endure, New Langton Arts, San Francisco, CA and Re-Make, Re-Model, d’Amelio Terras, New York, NY.

Claremont Museum of Art Unveils Community-Based Abstract Installation on Saturday, May 3rd

banner-packing house

Claremont, CA (April 22, 2008) — The Claremont Museum of Art is pleased to present a unique community-based abstract installation project, to be unveiled on Saturday, May 3rd in the courtyard on the east side of the Claremont Packing House.

The installation will be comprised of more than 80 painted panels created by children and adults, who were led by artist Janna Geary at the Museum’s April 12th Family Art Day. Geary has taken these panels and pieced them together using brass inserts and capscrews to create a one-of-a-kind Abstract Expressionist composition, which she will mount on the eight-foot-long wall in the Packing House courtyard. The community is invited to view this unique community project, on view through mid-June.

“This project is part of our ongoing ‘community engagement’ imitative,” said the CMA’s Executive Director William Moreno. “It is the second such installation – following the popular PhotoBooth – and we have many more planned in the future. I believe it’s important for museums to be centers of activity, and think this mural project, created by a variety of community members, fits that objective.

Los Angeles-based Abstract Expressionist artist Janna Geary is a Fine Arts/Illustration graduate of the Kendall College of Art and Design in Grand Rapids, MI, and has exhibited in many solo and group exhibitions, including Rockin’ for Peace at the House of Blues in L.A. in 2007, and the Los Angeles Open at Barnsdall Park in Hollywood in 2004. She has conducted several artmaking workshops for children of all ages. Geary said of her work; “The purpose of my art is to be a kind of ‘social therapy’ that functions through acknowledging experiences, emotions, or subject matter that is uncomfortable, and then re-presenting it to my audience in a matter in which they are forced to observe…sometimes through a different perspective, and sometimes through their own.”

Also coming up at the Claremont Museum of Art:

Saturday, April 26, 3 p.m.
REMINISCENCES: E. Gene Crain discusses several First Generation artists
Free for Museum Members, $5 for non-members (includes gallery admission)
E. Gene Crain, collector and friend to many of the First Generation artists, shares stories of his friendship with Millard Sheets, Phil Dike, and others, and discusses the history of his collection, widely acknowledged as one of the world’s most comprehensive collections of work by artists from the “California School.” First Generation Guest Curator Steve Comba hosts.

Sunday, April 27, 11 a.m. – 5 p.m.
FIRST GENERATION EXHIBITION CLOSING
Join us for the final day of the remarkable exhibition First Generation: Art in Claremont, 1907-1957, which traces the art history of the region in the first 50 years after the city’s incorporation in 1907.

About the Museum
The Claremont Museum of Art seeks to serve a diverse public as a regional museum of international significance and breadth. Grounded in Claremont’s important artistic legacy, the Museum engages artists and audiences through a compelling program of exhibitions and educational programs that connect the visual arts with contemporary life. In addition to a diverse slate of exhibitions, the Museum features an eclectic store offering contemporary and unexpected gifts from around the world. A comprehensive slate of educational programming and events are offered for all ages. Claremont Museum of Art is an independent, nonprofit 501(c)(3) organization.

Claremont Museum of Art Celebrates First Anniversary in April with series of Gallery Talks, Senior Days and Family Art Days

banner-packing house-2

Claremont, CA (March 25, 2008) — The Claremont Museum of Art is pleased to celebrate its first anniversary in April. “Our inaugural year has been extremely successful,” said CMA Director William Moreno. “Not only has the local community rallied around the Museum and its programs, almost 50% of our visitors come from the greater Los Angeles area, and that certainly is a significant trend.” To celebrate, we have a full calendar of programs for the whole family, including artmaking workshops, gallery talks and senior days. Bring the family and celebrate!

Wednesdays, April 2, 9, 16, 23 (NOT April 30)
SENIOR WEDNESDAYS IN APRIL
Seniors 62 and over receive special discounts and programs every Wednesday in April (except April 30):
• Special $2 admission to the galleries for seniors (As always, admission for Museum Members and children under 18 is FREE. Not a member? Take advantage of our special $30 annual senior membership.)
• Special senior discount of 20% off a single item at the acclaimed Museum Store
• Docents available starting at 11:30 a.m., reservations not necessary, open to the public
• Make a day of it! Visit one of the new West Village eateries and treat yourself to a senior discount matinee at the Laemmle Theatre, just steps away from the Museum.

Friday, April 4
FREE FIRST FRIDAY and CHAIR-ITY SIT-IN
4 – 7 p.m. Chair-ity Sit-in – Art Auction of artist-designed chairs in the Packing House, sponsored by the Claremont Community Foundation. Visit the Museum Store to view some of the amazing chairs! CMA Guest Curator Steve Comba and Museum Associate Melody Kriesel are artists featured in the auction.
5 – 8:30 p.m. Free Friday – Admission to the Museum is free the first Friday of every month, coinciding with Claremont’s First Friday Artwalk.

Saturday, April 5, 3 p.m.
REMINISCENCES: James Hueter discusses Henry Lee McFee
Free for Museum Members, $5 for non-members (includes gallery admission)
Artist James Hueter shares stories and discusses his former teacher, pioneering American Cubist painter and First Generation artist Henry Lee McFee, who taught at Claremont College and Chouinard Art Institute. First Generation Guest Curator Steve Comba hosts.

Saturday, April 12
IT’S OUR BIRTHDAY
Free admission to Museum all day, family art making and gallery talk
1 – 3 p.m. Family Art Day – Abstract Installation Project: Abstract Expressionist artist Janna Geary leads this family-friendly group painting project, which will become a large multi-dimensional in the courtyard east of the Packing House by May 2. Come dressed to paint!
3 – 4 p.m. Reminiscences: Artists and CMA Founders Harrison and Marguerite McIntosh share their personal recollections of their former neighbors, First Generation artists Jean and Arthur Ames, celebrated for their work in glazed tile, glass mosaic, and enamel. First Generation Guest Curator Steve Comba hosts.

Sunday, April 20, 11 a.m. – 5 p.m.
FAMILY ART DAY
Make a Clay Pot! Free and open to the public
Children are invited to learn how to make a clay pot with artist Mike Lardi, who will embellish the pots with a stylus, inspired by Pitcher, a work by Richard Petterson and Phil Dike, now on view in First Generation.

Saturday, April 26, 3 p.m.
REMINISCENCES: E. Gene Crain discusses several First Generation artists
Free for Museum Members, $5 for non-members (includes gallery admission)
E. Gene Crain, collector and friend to many of the First Generation artists, shares stories of his friendship with Millard Sheets, Phil Dike, and others, and discusses the history of his collection, widely acknowledged as one of the world’s most comprehensive collections of work by artists from the “California School.” First Generation Guest Curator Steve Comba hosts.

Sunday, April 27, 11 a.m. – 5 p.m.
FIRST GENERATION EXHIBITION CLOSING
Join us for the final day of the remarkable exhibition First Generation: Art in Claremont, 1907-1957, which traces the art history of the region in the first 50 years after the city’s incorporation in 1907.

First Generation: Art in Claremont 1907-1957

January 27 – April 27, 2008

On a clear day a century ago, one could see the peak of Mt. Baldy from virtually every corner of the Los Angeles basin, from ocean to desert. The original inhabitants of this area, the Tongva/Gabrielino Indians, called the mountain “Yoát,” or snow. Its siren song has drawn generations of settlers to its shadow. Since the late 19th century, prominent artists have been among those attracted to the foothills of Mt. Baldy and its neighboring peaks – and the city of Claremont, in particular. Whether it was the allure of the “great bald mountain” and its surrounding chaparral that first attracted painters and photographers to Claremont, or the opportunities provided by the birth of the schools and colleges founded to serve a rapidly growing population, a large number of distinguished visual artists settled here, greatly enriching the culture of the region and establishing early-on its prominence as an artistic haven.

First Generation traced the art history of the region, from the work of such artists as Hannah Tempest Jenkins, Emil Kosa, Jr., and William Manker to that of Millard Sheets and his circle in the 1930s. Sheets’s influence as artist and teacher extended as well to bringing artists such as Henry Lee McFee, Phil Dike, and Jean Ames to Scripps College, thereby enhancing the existing art community and assuring its lasting influence. “This exhibition includes the work of these and other artists important to Claremont’s history and reflects the conviction on which the Claremont Museum of Art is based,” said First Generation Guest Curator Steve Comba. “That Claremont’s artistic heritage is a rich and valuable resource for both present and future generations, one that deserves to be examined and celebrated.”